At ALA Midwinter this year, Que(e)ry was excited to learn that Philadelphia had named a street after activist Barbara Gittings, who among other things was involved in LGBT activism for libraries in the 1970s, resulting in the first LGBT caucus in a professional organization in the United States.
Also from ALA Midwinter, the GLBTRT announced the 2014 Stonewall Book awards, the 2014 Rainbow Book List, and the 2014 Over the Rainbow Book list. Check them out and promote them in your libraries!

At ALA Midwinter this year, Que(e)ry was excited to learn that Philadelphia had named a street after activist Barbara Gittings, who among other things was involved in LGBT activism for libraries in the 1970s, resulting in the first LGBT caucus in a professional organization in the United States.

Also from ALA Midwinter, the GLBTRT announced the 2014 Stonewall Book awards, the 2014 Rainbow Book List, and the 2014 Over the Rainbow Book list. Check them out and promote them in your libraries!

thelifeguardlibrarian:

With all the excitement, here’s just a note on the history of librarianship and the gay rights movement:
While I did know a bit about librarian activist Barbara Gittings (pictured above and featured here in My Daguerreotype Librarian) and I knew about the American Library Association’s GLBT Round Table, I did not realize the GLBTRT was founded as the very first lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender professional organization:
From Wikipedia:

In 1970, the ALA founded the first lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender professional organization, called the “Task Force on Gay Liberation”, now known as the GLBT Round Table. In the early 1970s, the Task Force on Gay Liberation campaigned to have books about the gay liberation movement at the Library of Congress reclassified from HQ 71–471 (“Abnormal Sexual Relations, Including Sexual Crimes”). In 1972, after receiving a letter requesting the reclassification, the Library of Congress agreed to make the shift, reclassifying those books into a newly created category, HQ 76.5 (“Homosexuality, Lesbianism—Gay Liberation Movement, Homophile Movement”).”

Today, from ALA:

The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender (GLBT) Round Table of the American Library Association is committed to serving the information needs of the GLBT professional library community, and the GLBT information and access needs of individuals at large.  We are committed to encouraging and supporting the free and necessary access to all information, as reflected by the missions of the American Library Association.

I’m feeling pretty decent about being a librarian today. And a member of ALA, at that. Let’s keep being allies. Let’s keep trying. Let’s try harder. OK?
(And h/t to John Chrastka over at EveryLibrary for enlightening me to all this good stuff.)

thelifeguardlibrarian:

With all the excitement, here’s just a note on the history of librarianship and the gay rights movement:

While I did know a bit about librarian activist Barbara Gittings (pictured above and featured here in My Daguerreotype Librarian) and I knew about the American Library Association’s GLBT Round Table, I did not realize the GLBTRT was founded as the very first lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender professional organization:

From Wikipedia:

In 1970, the ALA founded the first lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender professional organization, called the “Task Force on Gay Liberation”, now known as the GLBT Round Table. In the early 1970s, the Task Force on Gay Liberation campaigned to have books about the gay liberation movement at the Library of Congress reclassified from HQ 71–471 (“Abnormal Sexual Relations, Including Sexual Crimes”). In 1972, after receiving a letter requesting the reclassification, the Library of Congress agreed to make the shift, reclassifying those books into a newly created category, HQ 76.5 (“Homosexuality, Lesbianism—Gay Liberation Movement, Homophile Movement”).”

Today, from ALA:

The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender (GLBT) Round Table of the American Library Association is committed to serving the information needs of the GLBT professional library community, and the GLBT information and access needs of individuals at large.  We are committed to encouraging and supporting the free and necessary access to all information, as reflected by the missions of the American Library Association.

I’m feeling pretty decent about being a librarian today. And a member of ALA, at that. Let’s keep being allies. Let’s keep trying. Let’s try harder. OK?

(And h/t to John Chrastka over at EveryLibrary for enlightening me to all this good stuff.)

timetravelanddonuts:

From Life magazine: Photo from the 1971 ALA annual conference in Dallas. Barbara Gittings organized a booth offering free same-sex hugs and kisses.
The American Library Association’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table was the nation’s first GLBT professional organization. I’m proud to be part of such a forward-thinking field as librarianship.
(For those that are interested, the booth received a (predictably) mostly negative reaction, with little to no people stopping by for a free hug. So the staffers of the booth hugged and kissed each other. Gittings kissed Patience and Sarah author Alma Routsong (aka Isabel Miller) while cameras were rolling and made the nightly news. That same year she appeared with a panel of lesbians on the David Susskind Show to debunk gay stereotypes of the time. She was approached in a supermarket a week after the appearance by a middle-aged couple who claimed “You made me realize that you gay people love each other just the way Arnold and I do.”)

timetravelanddonuts:

From Life magazine: Photo from the 1971 ALA annual conference in Dallas. Barbara Gittings organized a booth offering free same-sex hugs and kisses.

The American Library Association’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table was the nation’s first GLBT professional organization. I’m proud to be part of such a forward-thinking field as librarianship.

(For those that are interested, the booth received a (predictably) mostly negative reaction, with little to no people stopping by for a free hug. So the staffers of the booth hugged and kissed each other. Gittings kissed Patience and Sarah author Alma Routsong (aka Isabel Miller) while cameras were rolling and made the nightly news. That same year she appeared with a panel of lesbians on the David Susskind Show to debunk gay stereotypes of the time. She was approached in a supermarket a week after the appearance by a middle-aged couple who claimed “You made me realize that you gay people love each other just the way Arnold and I do.”)