We had a great time on the road in Chicago, but it’s been almost a year since our last benefit party in NYC so this one’s seriously overdue:
Saturday, September 28, 2013 at 9pm
We’re excited for our first time at the Cake Shop (152 Ludlow St. New York) and our first time benefitting two great organizations: the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division, a queer cultural center, bookstore, and event space, who are currently fundraising for a permanent location after a successful year at the Strange Loop Gallery; and the Pop-Up Museum of Queer History, who have an upcoming exhibition titled HomoEconomics: LGBTQ histories of the Brooklyn Waterfront. 
$10 suggested donation, 21+. 
DJs and gogos to be announced. Stay tuned for more updates!

We had a great time on the road in Chicago, but it’s been almost a year since our last benefit party in NYC so this one’s seriously overdue:

Saturday, September 28, 2013 at 9pm

We’re excited for our first time at the Cake Shop (152 Ludlow St. New York) and our first time benefitting two great organizations: the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division, a queer cultural center, bookstore, and event space, who are currently fundraising for a permanent location after a successful year at the Strange Loop Gallery; and the Pop-Up Museum of Queer History, who have an upcoming exhibition titled HomoEconomics: LGBTQ histories of the Brooklyn Waterfront. 

$10 suggested donation, 21+. 

DJs and gogos to be announced. Stay tuned for more updates!

libraryjournal:

Set your calendars. Tell your friends. Reblog for your followers. Library Journal and Tumblr are joining forces, with the help of Togather, to host an ALA meetup to end all meetups.
Important facts:
Free wine & beer.
Raffle! Prizes includes signed advance copies of Richard Dawkins’s An Appetite for Wonder (Harper, Oct.) and LIBBANANAS.
Right before & at the same location as the Librarian Wardrobe/EveryLibrary party.
Official hashtag is #laserfingers. Make tumblarians known across platforms: tweet, tumbl, and Instagram the event.
So excited to see you all then!

libraryjournal:

Set your calendars. Tell your friends. Reblog for your followers. Library Journal and Tumblr are joining forces, with the help of Togather, to host an ALA meetup to end all meetups.

Important facts:

  • Free wine & beer.
  • Raffle! Prizes includes signed advance copies of Richard Dawkins’s An Appetite for Wonder (Harper, Oct.) and LIBBANANAS.
  • Right before & at the same location as the Librarian Wardrobe/EveryLibrary party.
  • Official hashtag is #laserfingers. Make tumblarians known across platforms: tweet, tumbl, and Instagram the event.

So excited to see you all then!

thelifeguardlibrarian:

With all the excitement, here’s just a note on the history of librarianship and the gay rights movement:
While I did know a bit about librarian activist Barbara Gittings (pictured above and featured here in My Daguerreotype Librarian) and I knew about the American Library Association’s GLBT Round Table, I did not realize the GLBTRT was founded as the very first lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender professional organization:
From Wikipedia:

In 1970, the ALA founded the first lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender professional organization, called the “Task Force on Gay Liberation”, now known as the GLBT Round Table. In the early 1970s, the Task Force on Gay Liberation campaigned to have books about the gay liberation movement at the Library of Congress reclassified from HQ 71–471 (“Abnormal Sexual Relations, Including Sexual Crimes”). In 1972, after receiving a letter requesting the reclassification, the Library of Congress agreed to make the shift, reclassifying those books into a newly created category, HQ 76.5 (“Homosexuality, Lesbianism—Gay Liberation Movement, Homophile Movement”).”

Today, from ALA:

The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender (GLBT) Round Table of the American Library Association is committed to serving the information needs of the GLBT professional library community, and the GLBT information and access needs of individuals at large.  We are committed to encouraging and supporting the free and necessary access to all information, as reflected by the missions of the American Library Association.

I’m feeling pretty decent about being a librarian today. And a member of ALA, at that. Let’s keep being allies. Let’s keep trying. Let’s try harder. OK?
(And h/t to John Chrastka over at EveryLibrary for enlightening me to all this good stuff.)

thelifeguardlibrarian:

With all the excitement, here’s just a note on the history of librarianship and the gay rights movement:

While I did know a bit about librarian activist Barbara Gittings (pictured above and featured here in My Daguerreotype Librarian) and I knew about the American Library Association’s GLBT Round Table, I did not realize the GLBTRT was founded as the very first lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender professional organization:

From Wikipedia:

In 1970, the ALA founded the first lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender professional organization, called the “Task Force on Gay Liberation”, now known as the GLBT Round Table. In the early 1970s, the Task Force on Gay Liberation campaigned to have books about the gay liberation movement at the Library of Congress reclassified from HQ 71–471 (“Abnormal Sexual Relations, Including Sexual Crimes”). In 1972, after receiving a letter requesting the reclassification, the Library of Congress agreed to make the shift, reclassifying those books into a newly created category, HQ 76.5 (“Homosexuality, Lesbianism—Gay Liberation Movement, Homophile Movement”).”

Today, from ALA:

The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender (GLBT) Round Table of the American Library Association is committed to serving the information needs of the GLBT professional library community, and the GLBT information and access needs of individuals at large.  We are committed to encouraging and supporting the free and necessary access to all information, as reflected by the missions of the American Library Association.

I’m feeling pretty decent about being a librarian today. And a member of ALA, at that. Let’s keep being allies. Let’s keep trying. Let’s try harder. OK?

(And h/t to John Chrastka over at EveryLibrary for enlightening me to all this good stuff.)

Story Time Reading List

Thanks to everyone who came to Story Time with the Que(e)ry Librarians last night at the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division! And thanks also to our lovely readers. We had a great time and hope you did too.

For those who asked, here’s a list of the selections we heard last night, with links to worldcat to help you find a copy in a local library or bookstore:

"Ill Fit" from The Aversive Clause by B.C. Edwards (forthcoming)

Daddy, Papa, and Me by Lesléa Newman (2009)

The Marvelous Land of Oz by L. Frank Baum (1904)

The Borrower by Rebecca Makkai (2011)

The Whale Who Wanted to be Small by Gill McBarnet (1985)

Freak Show by James St. James (2007)

Miss Twiggley’s Tree by Dorothea Warren Fox (1966)

"Miss Lucy Had a Steamboat" from How They Met, and other stories by David Levithan (2008)

We hope you’ll support BGSQD and these authors! We hope to have more events like this in the future, so stay tuned.

libraryjournal:

Meet Barbara Gordon, librarian at the Gotham City Public Library by day, and crime-fightin’ wonder Batgirl by night. Gordon was first introduced to the Batman comics and TV show in 1966, as an attempt to bring in female readers and viewers. While previous female characters (Batwoman and Bat-girl) were introduced in an attempt to dodge accusations of homosexuality between Batman and Robin, Batgirl wasn’t there for romance as much as she was for ass-kicking. And did I mention that she was a librarian? (via From the Library: Batgirl! | Bitch Media)

Follow the link to the original post from Bitch Media for more information on Batgirl. And join us for Beach Blanket Batgirl on August 17!

libraryjournal:

Meet Barbara Gordon, librarian at the Gotham City Public Library by day, and crime-fightin’ wonder Batgirl by night. Gordon was first introduced to the Batman comics and TV show in 1966, as an attempt to bring in female readers and viewers. While previous female characters (Batwoman and Bat-girl) were introduced in an attempt to dodge accusations of homosexuality between Batman and Robin, Batgirl wasn’t there for romance as much as she was for ass-kicking. And did I mention that she was a librarian? (via From the Library: Batgirl! | Bitch Media)

Follow the link to the original post from Bitch Media for more information on Batgirl. And join us for Beach Blanket Batgirl on August 17!

S is for Shhhhh...
"Books are Dead" reads the front page. Dick Marlowe and Johnny Mars battle it out for a byline, and somebody’s been defacing the cat books. S is for Shhhhh, Baby. Not sweater.
See the complete film featured at the Desk Set's Biblioball 2011, and featuring one of our very own Que(e)ry Librarians!

Radical Librarians Book Club

A Radical Librarians Book Club will be starting on Sunday, July 22, at Bluestockings Bookstore on the Lower East Side. We will be meeting at 2pm, on the 3rd Sunday of every month.

Our book for July 22nd is Questioning Library Neutrality: Essays from Progressive Librarians and is available for sale at Bluestockings. The book for our second meeting, on August 19, is Make Your Own History: Documenting Feminist and Queer Activism in the 21st Century.

The Radical Librarians Book Club is a group of aspiring and current librarians, anyone in the information science field, and people who are invested in re-envisioning the traditional library. We seek to examine issues of librarianship from a radical, politically-focused perspective, and build community within the field. We look forward to reading such texts as Radical Cataloging, Revolting Librarians Redux, and more.

Feel free to come check it out, and bring your ideas for future books/discussions.

Email us at RadLibBookClub@gmail.com with questions, or to get on our mailing list (1 email per month, announcing the upcoming books).  

Hope to see you there,
Elvis Bakaitis, Erica Saunders, and Sarah Rappo
(Current students in Queens College LIS program)

Happy birthday, Que(e)ry!

Today is Que(e)ry’s 2nd birthday! It’s hard to believe we had our first party 2 years ago today. Hug and/or buy a drink for your local Queerbrarian today!
We’re making plans for Que(e)ry 7, so stay tuned! Happy Pride week!
timetravelanddonuts:

From Life magazine: Photo from the 1971 ALA annual conference in Dallas. Barbara Gittings organized a booth offering free same-sex hugs and kisses.
The American Library Association’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table was the nation’s first GLBT professional organization. I’m proud to be part of such a forward-thinking field as librarianship.
(For those that are interested, the booth received a (predictably) mostly negative reaction, with little to no people stopping by for a free hug. So the staffers of the booth hugged and kissed each other. Gittings kissed Patience and Sarah author Alma Routsong (aka Isabel Miller) while cameras were rolling and made the nightly news. That same year she appeared with a panel of lesbians on the David Susskind Show to debunk gay stereotypes of the time. She was approached in a supermarket a week after the appearance by a middle-aged couple who claimed “You made me realize that you gay people love each other just the way Arnold and I do.”)

timetravelanddonuts:

From Life magazine: Photo from the 1971 ALA annual conference in Dallas. Barbara Gittings organized a booth offering free same-sex hugs and kisses.

The American Library Association’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table was the nation’s first GLBT professional organization. I’m proud to be part of such a forward-thinking field as librarianship.

(For those that are interested, the booth received a (predictably) mostly negative reaction, with little to no people stopping by for a free hug. So the staffers of the booth hugged and kissed each other. Gittings kissed Patience and Sarah author Alma Routsong (aka Isabel Miller) while cameras were rolling and made the nightly news. That same year she appeared with a panel of lesbians on the David Susskind Show to debunk gay stereotypes of the time. She was approached in a supermarket a week after the appearance by a middle-aged couple who claimed “You made me realize that you gay people love each other just the way Arnold and I do.”)

Tumblarians

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Ok, folks. Below is the START of a list of library/librarian-ish tumblrs. Please, if I’ve missed you or your tumblr bff, just drop a note in my ask or email. I’ll throw this in a link on my homepage and I’ll eventually sort by alpha, maybe even by type.

Celebrarians. Word.

Read More

The People's Library at Occupy Wall St.

UPDATE: We’re now collecting book donations for the Occupy Wall Street Library tomorrow at Que(e)ry V: Open Access. All books are accepted but the People’s Library especially seeks books of resistance, people’s history, economics, finance, contemporary philosophy, ecology, DIY books, non-English books, materials for low-literacy readers, and reference materials. Multiple copies are always welcome; copies of Howard Zinn’s “A People’s History of the United States” are in high demand. Or you can always bring books and supplies directly to them. Spread the word!